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Additional Needs and Disabilities Education News SEND Surveys

ATLAS Consultation: SEND and Alternative Provision Green Paper

On Wednesday 29th June, ATLAS is taking part in consultation about the SEND and Alternative Provision Green Paper alongside the Council for Disabled Children. All young people who take part will receive a £15 voucher for their time and expertise!

If you are a young person with additional needs and disabilities living in Surrey (UK) and want to be involved, get in touch with us through social media or email us: ATLAS@surreycc.gov.uk

What is the SEND and Alternative Provision Green Paper?

The SEND and Alternative Provision Green Paper is a Review into the SEND system that the Department for Education made in 2019, they did this to understand why the system was struggling, despite the potential and vision of the Children and Families Act 2014 as it was becoming financially unsustainable and wasn’t always resulting in positive outcomes. In March 2022 the Review was published as a Green Paper paving the way for change.

Green Papers are consultation documents produced by the Government that looks at several key areas in the system that need change and make proposals for that change. These include national standards, role of schools, education, health and care plans, accountability, and support. The aim of the Green Paper is to allow people both inside and outside Parliament to give the department feedback on its policy or legislative proposals.

What is the SEND Review?

The SEND Review looks at ways to make sure that the SEND system is reliable, high quality and united across education, health, and care. It also makes sure that money is being spent fairly, efficiently, and effectively as well as making sure that the support available to children and young people is sustainable in the future. This is being led by the Department for Education, working closely with other government departments / partners in education, health, and social care.

What is their next step?

A consultation phase will be taking place where a group of stakeholders will have an opportunity to review and reflect on the proposals, giving families frustrated by the existing, complicated, and bureaucratic system of support the opportunity to shape how a new system will work in the future and give them confidence that their local school will meet their children’s needs so they can achieve their full potential.

3 key challenges facing the SEND and alternative provision system.

  • Navigating the SEND system and alternative systems is not a positive experience for too many children, young people and their families.
  • Outcomes for children and young people with SEND systems or in alternative ones are consistently worse.
  • Despite the continuing investment, the system is not financially sustainable.

Detailed proposals in the SEND and alternative provision green paper include:

The consultation will be looking at the following proposals:

  • Setting new national standards across education, health and care to build on the foundations created through the Children and Families Act 2014, for a higher performing SEND system.
  •  A simplified EHCP through plans to make them more flexible, supporting parents to make informed choices with a list of appropriate placements tailored to their child’s needs meaning less time spent researching for the right school.
  • Councils to introduce ‘local inclusion plans’ that bring together early years, schools and post-16 education with health and care services, improving oversight and transparency through the publication of new ‘local inclusion dashboards’ to make roles and responsibilities of all partners within the system clearer for parents and young people, helping to make better outcomes.
  • A new national framework for councils to match national standards and offer clarity on the level of support expected and put the system on financial stability in the future, changing the culture and practice in mainstream education to be more inclusive and better at identifying and supporting needs, including earlier intervention and improved support.
  • Improving workforce training through the introduction of a new SENCo NPQ for school SENCos and increasing the number of staff with an accredited level 3 qualification in early years settings.
  • A reformed and integrated role for alternative provision (AP), with a new delivery model in every local area focused on early intervention. AP will form an integral part of local SEND systems with improvements to settings and more funding stability.

More Information

For more information see the Council for Disabled Children’s Website and find a summary of the SEND review on the Department for Education’s gov.uk webiste.

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News

Bockett’s Farm Park Trip  

On Saturday 23rd of April we had a lovely day out to Bockett’s Farm as a way of celebrating National Pet Month. During our visit we discussed the importance of assistance animals for people with additional needs and disabilities as well as how animals has helped them.

At the farm we were allocated our own spacious barn where we had lunch and ATLAS were given yummy Easter eggs that had kindly been donated from ADP and Enterprise. Our barn could also be us as a safe space if needed. We were able to do lots of fun activities with the animals. Firstly, we walked around the farm where we saw horses, ponies, Shetland ponies and Giant Poitou Donkeys at the stable which was a fan favourite among ATLAS members as many of them didn’t want to leave theses friendly animals. We also went to the Animal Discovery Barn where we meet fluffy sheep’s, goats, llamas, pigs, and cows up close; lots of pictures were taken of these cute animals. After lunch we went on another farm walk where we discovered llamas and Swedish Fallow deer grazing peacefully in their paddocks. Then we went over to Little Hoppington were we met cute furry little friends which included rabbits, degu, pigs, and rats. During this time, we were able to have our animal encounter where we could pet pretty rabbits, a happy chicken, and a fun guinea pig. Since so many pictures were taken of the animals, we had a mini photography and video competition where the winner was able to buy something in the gift shop which was full of fun things to choose form. ATLAS members really enjoyed the trip as many of them find animals a personal comfort and relaxing to spend time with, some talked about their pets who help them to feel calm. 😊

If you would like more information or to join ATLAS, please email us at: ATLAS@surreycc.gov.uk where you join in fun on opportunities such as our trips.

Alternatively, you can message us on social media:

Some pictures from our fun trip 😊

One of the ATLAS members petting a adorable black rabbit.
One of the ATLAS members petting a adorable black rabbit
ATLAS member petting a sweet black rabbit.
ATLAS member petting a sweet black rabbit
ATLAS member petting a sweet black rabbit.
ATLAS member petting a sweet black rabbit
A photo of two friendly goats.
A photo of two friendly goats
Categories
Achievement Additional Needs and Disabilities Autism Bullying Celebrities Health Inspirational People Media Mental Health Neurodiversity News Personal Story Strongman

Tom Stoltman: The world’s strongest man and his Autism

“Autism is my secret weapon”.

Tom Stoltman standing on the podium after winning worlds strongest man 2022
Tom Stoltman after winning WSM 2022
Tom Stoltman with his 2021 trophy after winning his first worlds strongest man.
Tom Stoltman after winning WSM (world’s strongest man) 2021

Who is Tom Stoltman?:

Tom Stoltman is the current worlds strongest man after winning the competition in May 2022. He is also the:

  • 2021 Worlds Strongest man
  • World record holder for the heaviest Atlas stone ever lifted (286kg!),
  • A two-time back-to-back winner of Britain’s strongest man,
  • A two-time winner of Scotland’s strongest man along with many other incredible podiums such as 3rd in worlds ultimate strongman and 2nd in the 2021 giants live finals.

Tom was diagnosed with autism when he was 8 years old and has spoken about his own struggles inside and outside of school. He has mentioned being bullied and worrying about what people would think if they found out he was autistic.

Tom and Luke Stoltman competing and supporting each other during a competition.
Tom and, his brother, Luke Stoltman competing and cheering each other on

Tom’s Autism – in his own words.

I kept autism hidden”

“I didn’t want my mates to laugh at me”

However, he mentions that after telling his friends and others about his autism he felt a tremendous amount of relief after being accepted and supported by them. His friends made sure that he knew they accepted him for who he was and that it didn’t change a thing about their friendship which is truly phenomenal.

Luke Stoltman (Tom’s brother) has also talked about Tom’s experiences and growing up with him when he was younger. Referencing times that Tom would really struggle, he says,

“if mum went out shopping, he (Tom) wouldn’t stop crying till she came back” and that “he wouldn’t go anywhere by himself

Tom has said that he found it difficult when something didn’t go as planned, as he would become fearful and potentially breakdown. This also wasn’t helped when others would say that it didn’t matter, as this just made him feel very different to his friends and others.

Tom saw a great change in his life when he was first invited to go the gym by his older brother Luke as this was the start of an incredible ongoing career in the internationally competitive arena of ‘strongman’ for both. Tom found comfort in pushing himself in the gym as he mentioned he didn’t get along with the more traditional side of school such as maths and English, but he truly thrived when it came to Physical education and many other sports.

Tom and Luke Stoltman smiling and pointing at the trophy after winning the 2021 worlds strongest man competition.
Tom, and his brother, Luke Stoltman after Toms win at World’s strongest man 2021

What he has done for the awareness of autism

Tom Stoltman has gone on many podcasts, interviews and has personally made videos on him and his brothers YouTube channel. Some of these are linked below. He has been quoted saying phenomenal things such as:

“Autism is my secret weapon” and that it should be

“Used as a superpower”, he has also talked about how that just because he is labelled that it doesn’t make him different. He strives to be an example to other autistic children and show them that they too will achieve incredible things.

Podcasts/ videos worth a watch:

World Autism Awareness Day – YouTube Tom Stoltman opens up about his experiences with autism and aims to spread awareness.

 Talking about autism! | Tom Stoltman – YouTube

  AUTISM IS A SUPERPOWER – YouTube Tom Stoltman

Links for support/education on accepting autism:

Autism Acceptance – Autism at Kingwood

Dont try to change autistic people, accept their differences. (autism.org.uk)

Information found from:

 Tom Stoltman – Wikipedia        World Autism Awareness Day – YouTube

Stoltman Brothers – YouTube    Talking about autism! | Tom Stoltman – YouTube

CNN: Tom Stoltman harnesses ‘superpower’ of autism to become the World’s Strongest Man – YouTube

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accessibility Achievement Additional Needs and Disabilities Celebrities Inspirational People mobility aids News Spina Bifida

“There’s wheels stuck to my butt, how can that not be fun?”

Spina Bifida is a birth defect of the spinal cord; this is what Aaron has and is why he is on a wheelchair and has very limited use of his legs.

Aaron ‘Wheelz’ Fotheringham has never let being on a wheelchair limit what he wants to do. When he was a small boy, he did anything anyone else his age could do, he just had to figure out how to make it work for him.

“When you say you are ‘in’ a wheelchair it’s like saying that you are confined to it. I’m ‘on’ my wheelchair, I ride it like a skater ‘on’ his skateboard.”

A young Aaron Fotheringham sitting in his wheelchair smiling with his arms crossed. He is wearing a navy blue, red and white stripped polo shirt with blue denim jeans.
In the background behind him is a large rock and some trees.

When he first ever received his first walker, he was off and running. Following on from the walker came crutches, which he got the hang of quickly. He would put on a Superman cape and blast down the hall on crutches believing, as any other 4-year-old, that he could fly. At age 8 Aaron go his first wheelchair which change his life for the better and opened new adventures for Aaron.

The age of 8 was when Aaron started riding at skateparks. One of his older brothers Brian is a BMXer. Before Aaron started having a go, he had been going to the park with Brian and their dad for weeks, but Aaron would just watch. Like any other child Aaron found the first time scary and he fell hard, but he was never one to give up just because it wasn’t easy. So, he tried again and from then on, he was hooked.

Aaron wants to change the world’s view of people on wheelchairs and to help everyone see their own challenges in a new way. You do not have to be on a wheelchair or handicapped to be inspired by what he is able to do and has achieved.

“I was able to go further than I could’ve ever dreamed of – all because of my wheelchair”

Over the years, Aaron has challenged himself to discover even more difficult stunts. In 2005, he achieved a mid-air 180-degree turn. On July 13th, 2006, he landed the first wheelchair backflip. Four years later August 26, 2010 he landed the first ever double backflip. As if this isn’t enough, on February 9th, 2011, he landed his very first front flip in New Zealand, and on August 25, 2012, he stunned Brazilians by jumping and successfully landing a 50-ft gap off the Mega Ramp in his chair. He is a 4-time winner of the Wheelchair Motocross (WCMX) World Championships and has also performed the first Wheelchair Flair/backflip 180, which he posted online.

Aaron Fotheringham in his wheelchair on one back wheel doing a wheelie, smiling and his arm to the side and his hand with his pointing finger pointing up. He is wearing black denim jeans, a black vest top with decorative imaging on it, dirty white trainers and a black cap on his head.
The background is red.

After posting that first ever backflip on the Internet, life has changed for Aaron; he has travelled globally, both performing and speaking. He has attended summer camps for disabled children as a coach/mentor, and he has been featured in magazines, newspapers, and sports television. Aaron enjoys showing young kids with disabilities that a wheelchair can be a tool, not a restriction. He loves helping younger children learn how to handle their chairs in new and different ways and teaching them a trick or two. Someday he hopes to design and build the most wicked chair in the world.

Aaron “Wheelz” Fotheringham – The Story

Video description:

A youtube video documentary about Aaron’s life and rise to fame. There are a sequence of clips of Aaron talking to the camera, learning and landing a number of different wheel chair stunts, attending movie premiere’s and enjoying his life.

Video Transcript:

“I wanna be be cool! I wanna be cool!” A few people can be heard cheering and then the sound of the wheelchair crashing into the ramp. “Dude I’m alive”, people cheer. More crashing sounds.

“I’m Aaron Fotheringham, most people call me Wheelz. I was born with Spina Bifida. The doctors didn’t think I’d really be independent at all or be able to sit up or do anything on my own: need to be assisted my whole life.

“But I didn’t let that stop me from keeping up. When all my friends would be riding their bikes around, I would hop on my wheelchair and chase them all around the streets.”

“Since those days my life has changed so much. Somehow I have been able to travel the world from country to country. I’ve been able to meet my idols and people who inspire me, perform in live shows in front of thousands of people and basically go further than I ever could have dreamed, all because of my wheelchair”. People cheering.

“Um, ok, well I was adopted when I was born to an awesome family in Los Vegas. They’re not my biological parents, but pretty much they’re everything, you know, they took care of me since birth and given me everything I have. Had to be a big trial on them and a big risk ’cause adopting a kid with Spina Bifida is, you know, like buying a car that’s got a lot of problems, a lot of work. Just also having to go in, either having a kidney problem or problem with my spine.”

“Well when I first started going to school, and like, they would always ask if I wanted to be put into adaptive PE with other kids on wheelchairs and I was always against that, because I though well I’m just like every other kid, I’m just on a wheelchair. So I would always fight and make them put me in regular PE. The coaches were always pumped because I would always be there and just want to do whatever the other kids were doing. So I think that was an important part was just having, you know, no one treat me any different. And my parents would always, if I would ask for help or something, they would say: your legs aren’t in pain at all, you can do it yourself. So they would just treat me like they would treat any of my other brothers.”

“You know, I think your disability is mostly in your head. You’re only as disabled as you feel. Just always having fun with it and never seeing it as a true disability. Like I don’t wake up in the morning and think: oh crap I’ve got to ride a wheelchair today. It’s just, like you get up and put your shoes on, I’m hopping onto an awesome wheelchair.”

“It’s pretty sweet to be able to help people look at their wheelchair as something just besides a medical device and it can actually be something really fun. Like, honestly there’s just wheels stuck to my butt, how can that not be fun?”

“We’re just here at one of the nitro circuit premiere’s getting ready to see the movie for the first time. Never been on the red carpet before, I feel like I should wipe my wheels before I got on the red carpet.”

Singing.

“Wheelz is fun, he’s really cool. He’s got the most dry sense of humour you could ever imagine. First time I saw him, he hit the ground and he’s laying there like: I’ll never walk again! and I was like so, I didn’t know whether to laugh, I didn’t know. He’s just always being awesome, I can’t be awesome all the time, I can’t even walk but that’s kinda what we got in common so we’re good.”

Background music and cheering.

“Not too long ago I went to my first x games and I’d watch Travis and I saw him up close for the first time and I was star struck. And I waved at him and he waved back at me. Saw Travis’s double back flip and I was like I wanna do a double back. And then a couple of years later they call me up and I’m doing shows with them and then I’m landing a double back flip. It’s just, you know, it’s crazy, I’m scarred to dream too insane because everything seems to be coming true.”

Background music.

“Those are always the best moments of my life.”

Cheering.

Dude, my teeth are missing again! You lost your teeth? Again! I had so much fun knocking my teeth out the first time that I can’t help it!.

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Covid 19 News

News: UK coronavirus rules relaxed for people with autism and learning disabilities

The UK government has announced their change in policy for those people that have autism and learning disabilities. Now, there are flexible measures for people with autism and learning disabilities can now exercise more than once a day and travel outside their local area with precaution under lockdown guidelines. How amazing! Check out the link below for more information!

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/14/uk-coronavirus-rules-autism-learning-disabilities-lockdown 

 

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News SEND

Virtual SYAS

We are proud to announce Virtual SYAS is taking place next week via Facebook Video Chat Friday 27th March! Come and join in!

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News SEND

Surrey County Council’s SEND Partnership Strategy!

Our wonderful SEND Youth Advisors experience features in Surrey County Council’s SEND Partnership Strategy – click to check it out!

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News SEND

SYAS – SEND Youth Advisors Surrey

SYAS is a participation group for children and young people age 10-25 with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) living in Surrey.

There are two SYAS groups across Surrey:

Epsom – runs the 3rd Wednesday of every month
Woking – runs the 1st Thursday of every month

If you would like to be involved make sure to contact us!
Email: User.voice@surreycc.gov.uk
Facebook: SYA Surrey
Twitter & Instagram: @Ourvoicesurrey