Categories
Additional Needs and Disabilities Autism Neurodiversity Personal Story Safety Self-Care

My Meltdowns and Shutdowns

Definitions

Meltdown – a response to an overwhelming situation that includes signs of distress.

Shutdown – where a person may withdraw from the people and environment around them. They may need their own space and time to process.

My Meltdowns

I don’t like meltdowns because when I used to have really big, long and bad meltdowns I used to say a lot of mean things, tell lies, say horrible things to others and myself.

Meltdowns make me look like I am refusing to do something or am reluctant to do something when I’m not – I’m in a meltdown.

I used to run off and hide, but I don’t do that anymore unless it is for a fun activity where people aren’t going to get worried. I used to also climb up trees and bushes to hide from people when I was having a meltdown, or hide underneath something, but I don’t do this anymore. I now cover my face with my hands, people understand I’m not hiding to be rude, I just need some alone time.

I don’t like to make people worried.

I like to walk, jog or run-in safe areas when I am having a meltdown to feel safe – I still do this.

Recently I have been having less meltdowns than I used to, which are also smaller than they used to be. I have been having a lot of shutdowns recently.

My Shutdowns

I have had a lot of shutdowns in the evenings since I finished college for summer holidays. In the last 7 weeks I have had a shutdown almost everyday.

During the summer holidays I have been going to a lot of clubs, and I have been having a lot of 10 to 40 minutes shutdowns at the clubs that I have been attending in the mornings and the afternoons. Sometimes I feel sorry for the staff who try to help me, but I also worry that they may call someone over and make it an incident.

A lot of people ask me if I am okay when I am having a shutdown, but I am not always able to answer, especially when I am really anxious. There have been a lot of transitions lately that are really busy and loud, which have not helped my anxiety. Some mornings I am too anxious to go into clubs and the staff I have good relationships with have to help me enter the site.

Some days I cry a lot when I am really anxious. People might worry because I might not seem like myself and then ask me a lot of questions at once about how I am and how I have been. Sometimes it can be overwhelming to talk about these things; sometimes I’m not ready to talk about it. When this happens, they might get into my personal space. I worry if people who don’t get tested regularly for Covid-19, get into my personal space.

Sometimes the behaviours of other children and young people at clubs and activities can cause me to be really anxious. Especially bad or violent behaviour.

When I am tired, I find things harder to do and possibly more overwhelming. This can make me cry and I don’t always immediately know what it is that has led to the problem.

How I manage overwhelming situations

Some of the ways I notice that I am becoming overwhelmed is when:

  • There are loud noises
  • There is a difficult situation
  • I see someone breaking the law or doing something dangerous
  • I get too hot
  • I am stressed

Some of the ways I look after myself when I am overwhelmed:

  • Weighted blankets/jackets
  • Fidget toys and chew toys
  • Sitting with my dog, she puts her paws on my lap
  • Going for walk
  • Writing stories
Categories
Additional Needs and Disabilities Anxiety Health Mental Health Self-Care Social

Tips and Tricks: Supporting Mental Health and Emotional Wellbeing with Additional Needs and Disabilities

Introduction

We found sharing their self-care tips and tricks with each other really helpful, especially during Covid. ATLAS members have found that during the pandemic it has been even more important to think about how you are spending our time, as we’ve not been able to do our everyday ‘normal’ stuff, like socialising.

We hope that others may find our thoughts and discussions around maintaining your mental health and wellbeing will be helpful to others.

The Importance of Self-Care

It has and continues to be important that you keep yourself active (however YOU define active), your mind active, and do things that you enjoy whilst staying safe. This can include any hobbies that you have like reading, drawing, listening, making music, going out for a walk: anything at all that you think will help you.

It is also important to make sure that you are eating and drinking enough water every day as that has a massive benefit to improving your mental health and wellbeing.

Tips and Tricks

We’re all different for what we find helpful. Here are some of the activities ATLAS members use for self-care:

  • Keep in touch with your friends because you don’t do much [during a pandemic].
  • Call someone everyday – video call not just phone call or texting. Because if I don’t socialise for a while, I will forget how to socialise.
  • Meditation and listening to music.
  • Click and collect libraries.
  • Making time for your hobbies
  • Weighted blankets help a lot. Weight toys, weighted lap pad and weighted jacket.
  • Baths and Showering.
  • I have been trying to explore working with my senses. A lot of time with myself, music really helps because it is hard not hearing people’s voices. Without sound I will get tinnitus or hallucinate.
  • White noises are also really good, especially with Autism I find big changes in volume different, so having noise all the time helps when people call me.
  • Keeping bin by the bed.
  • Using a bed desk if you can’t get out of bed so you are changing your work environment and home environment.
  • I try and make sure I have a main event every day. I think it is an ADHD thing – I can’t do something when I am waiting for something planned.
  • Routines!

Routines

ATLAS members find that routines help to structure out our day-to-day life and activities. Here are some of the areas we use routines to help us with:

  • Eat healthy meals.
  • Meal plans.
  • Have a timetable.
  • Have a sleep routine.
  • Similar sleep / wake up times.
  • Light exercise.
  • Having alarms / reminders.
  • Post-it notes.
  • Put reminders on phone.
  • Write in a diary.
  • Try and have different places in the house for different activities.
  • Everyday, do something that you enjoy.
  • Have structure in school / work.
  • Have a time in the day where you step away from screens.
  • Make exercise fun – put on music and dance or play a game that includes exercise like a virtual reality game (e.g. Wii Fit).
  • Writing plans.
  • Listen to music.

We find that routines are really helpful; they give us the information on what we want or need to be doing and when, as well as helping us to manage our time.

Importantly, routines help us to be more independent, reduce anxiety, and some of us have found it has also helped us build more confidence in ourselves!

Self-Care During Self-Care!

When developing routines, we feel it is important that you:

  • Don’t pressure yourself.
  • Take little breaks.
  • Tell people close to you what you need, or how you feel.

Do you have any tips and tricks you would like to share? Please comment below!