Categories
Education SEND Surveys

Public Feedback on Surrey’s Alternative Provision

Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Additional Mental Health Support
  3. Additional Support for those with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities:
  4. Adaptable Teaching Styles & Understanding Needs
  5. 1:1 Support
  6. Local Alternative Provision

Introduction

Alternative Provision is education outside school for pupils who don’t attend mainstream school for reasons which might include being excluded, behaviour concerns, mental health or illness. Examples of Alternative Provision include Pupil Referral Units, the Alternative Learning Programme (ALP), Short Stay Schools and Access to Education (A2E).

Surrey County Council are redesigning the strategy for Alternative Provision and the User Voice and Participation Team created two online surveys to get the views of children, young people, parents and carers. The surveys were open from 23rd October 2020 – 17th November 2020. We received responses from 65 children and young people and 78 parents and carers. Below are the main things that respondents told us they would like to see in Alternative Provision:

Additional Mental Health Support

38% of children and young people said that mental health was one of the main barriers that affected them staying in mainstream education. Parents and carers also expressed that mental health was a significant issue that they felt needed attention. Therefore, more mental health support is needed to help children and young people to remain in education. Children and young people need to be able to access support easily and in a timely manner to ensure that their mental health issues are addressed quickly, and their education is not affected.

This is what some of the respondents had to say:

‘I could benefit by having someone to talk to whenever I’m feeling down or nervous, someone who could help me when I’m stressed or struggling with work etc’ Young person

‘Someone in the room knowing about my mental health and actually taking the time to help me, without cutting corners’ Young person

‘Support from a doctor or mental health professional as needed’ Parent/Carer.

Additional Support for those with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities

44% of parents and carers said that undiagnosed special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) or lack of support for those with SEND was the main barrier to their child or young person remaining in mainstream education. A number of children and young people also said that they felt their additional needs were a barrier to remaining in education. We therefore need to ensure that children and young people with SEND are diagnosed in a timely manner and that enough support is put in place to help them manage their education. Many parents and carers recognise that the cause of this is often due to a lack of funding for schools which is an area that they feel needs to be addressed.

This is what some of the respondents had to say:

‘People to help with understanding additional need even if people can’t see them’ Young person.

‘Struggle on daily basis – waiting assessment for ADHD – find classrooms very distracting’ Young person.

‘Teachers need more training and support in managing children with additional needs who perhaps do not have an EHCP in place’ Parent/Carer.

Adaptable Teaching Styles & Understanding Needs

A number of respondents were frustrated at the ‘one size fits all’ approach that they feel is often in place in education. It is important that teaching staff have a good understanding of their students’ individual needs and can adapt their teaching styles so that nobody gets left behind.

This is what some of the respondents had to say:

‘Teachers educated in different styles of pupil engagement and schools being adaptable to support this’ Parent/Carer.

‘Tasks explained in different ways if the first way is too difficult to understand’ Young person.

1:1 Support

When children and young people feel like they are falling behind in education, it can cause them a lot of anxiety and, due to class sizes, it is not always possible for the teacher to spend as much time as they need with individual pupils. Respondents from both surveys said that it would be beneficial to have more 1:1 support in place to help children and young people remain in education.

This is what some of the respondents had to say:

‘More 1 to 1 support earlier in schooling to prevent phobia from developing and placement to fail’ Young person.

‘Time out of the classroom and more 1-1 support’ Parent/Carer

Local Alternative Provision

Although some children and young people said that they would be happy to attend alternative provision that was in a different town, more than half said that travelling a long way was likely to affect their attendance. Similarly, over 70% of parents and carers felt that travelling a long distance would impact on their child or young person’s ability to attend e.g. due to anxiety, tiredness etc. We therefore need to ensure that we have enough Alternative Provision available across Surrey to avoid young people having to make unreasonable journeys.

This is what some of the respondents had to say:

‘The fact that I had to wake up every day and travel 2 hours a day to school and back was exhausting’ Young person.

‘This has happened to my son as he was travelling 45 minutes each way in a taxi. He is now unable to attend due to fatigue and anxiety and a reduced timetable is not an option due to the travelling time’ Parent/Carer.

Other things that respondents said they would like to see from Alternative Provision included:

  • Outdoor space‘‘I need space to run and climb when I feel stressed’ Young person.
  • Small classes and separate rooms that students can go to if they need some time out‘A comfortable setting, not just a classroom with different areas if I needed to be alone rather than surrounded by lots of people’ Young person.
  • Nice buildings‘They don’t have a great space to work from. They are teaching in rundown premises which need updating and, compared to local schools, that doesn’t seem fair’ Parent/Carer.
  • Kind teachers ‘Good fun teachers that are more of a friend but can be professional when they need to be’ Young person.

If you would like to read more about the results of the surveys, please see the full reports below:

Categories
Bullying Care Education Mental Health Personal Story

The Importance of Alternative Learning Provision

This personal account was written by a young person and they have shared it with the User Voice and Participation Team. This young person wishes to remain anonymous.

“Mainstream education was difficult for me because of the bullying I received from other students. Before other students found out my mum had a disability I was like any other person in the school, I had lots of friends in and out of school, but this all changed overnight. There was a boy in my class who was known for bullying students, I really don’t know how he found out about my mum’s disability but he started to walk past me and pretend he was on crutches, other people then started to do the same. 

I would go into school, have form time and then walk to lesson, every time there would be a group of young people pretending to walk on crutches and laughing to each other. This then progressed to them finding out my father had died, they then started to make fun of this. I tried to deal with it by taking it as a joke, hoping they would stop, but I could not take anymore by Christmas. I spoke to my head of house about it and I felt it was not taken seriously. This response had a detrimental effect on my mental health, and I started to make up excuses not to go to school, the school would send work home for me to complete, which I was doing (Year 8).

At the beginning of Year 9 my mum and myself were asked to go to a meeting at school, we were told the main instigator of the bullying had moved to the other side of the year and the rest of his group had been expelled. I agreed to go back to school however because of my trauma, I now found it hard to be around lots of people, so I was put in isolation. This was the worst thing that could have happened because the bully then ended up in the same classroom as me.

My anxiety then went through the roof and I then refused to return to school. I felt the school were not very understanding of my issues and threatened to arrest my mum for letting me stay home.

The school did not send any work back home to me as I was not de-rolled and my mum was still being threatened. This added a lot of anxiety to what I was already feeling, in Year 9 I still managed to get out over the weekend, but this stopped quickly by Christmas as I was beaten up by the bully and his group of friends in town.

I then stopped going out for a year and a half. I was struggling with my mental health and I was referred to CAMHS.

At the beginning of Year 11 the school contacted my mum and suggested that I went to Access to Education (A2E), I was anxious about this as I had not seen anyone for a number of months.

A2E came over to my house to meet me, I was nervous, but they started a conversation about football and that put me at ease. They explained I would only be with one other person and this gave me the courage to give it a go. They eased me by letting me do the first week’s lessons online. The following week I was picked up by one of the workers and taken to the centre, she kept me calm by talking about football.

A2E supported me in that when I was having a bad day, I could do my lessons online at home and this helped a lot. A2E was more informal than school, I was allowed to call the teachers by their first name which made a difference. They mixed the day up with lessons and then we had a fun activity. There was no PE which I feel could have benefitted me but in general I felt safe and was able to learn without feeling anxious.

A positive experience was when I attended A2E another young person from my school came to the centre and he had the same experience with the same people. We supported one another through our time there and it confirmed my experience at school was unmanageable, it also began to help with my recovery.

If I could add anything to A2E I would want to include physical activities where possible. What made A2E the ideal alternative provision was the attitude of the workers involved. Their approach made A2E the best provision for me at the time, I cannot think of anything else other than to include PE, that could have made my experience better. Overall, I think there should be more alternative learning provisions like A2E for young people as there are a lot of young people struggling with mainstream education.”

Categories
Covid 19 Education University

Staying Safe at University

Last updated: 20th October
By Rowan Foster

Key Messages

Remember – ‘hands, face, space’.

a government advert for keeping safe in the pandemic. Three vertical rectangles are shown in a line. The first is blue with the online of a running tap, it reads: wash hands. The second is yellow with a line drawing of someone wearing a medical mask, it reads: cover face. the third is pink with the outline of two people looking at each other across a distance, it reads: make space. The NHS logo is shown in the top right and the HM Government logo in the top left.
A government advert for keeping safe during the pandemic: wash hands, cover face, make space
  • Wash your hands regularly
  • Wear a face covering, where rules apply
  • Keep a 2m distance
  • Socialise only with your household, or a maximum of 6 people
  • Get a test and self-isolate if you develop symptoms
  • Keep an eye on the local alert level, and make changes based on this
  • Use the NHS Test and Trace app

Be prepared for a different university experience!

Whether you’re a fresher, returning student, or a postgrad, you’re likely to have a few concerns about the upcoming academic year. This year’s going to be different in a lot of ways, especially in terms of student life. We want to remind you that you can still have a fulfilling and positive university experience even under these regulations; but we urge you to be responsible and follow guidance as much as you can. We know it’s not easy, but every person can make a difference and help keep the virus contained. We’ve put together this blog post, detailing the changes you’re likely to see, and the guidance you need to bear in mind – we hope you find it useful.